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Health Benefits of Tomatoes::::

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In case you were wondering, a tomato is a technically a fruit, because it’s seed-bearing and develops from the ovary of a flowering plant. (Botanically speaking, vegetables consist of other plant parts, like roots, leaves, and stems.) But when it comes to nutrition, tomatoes —along with seedy cucumbers and zucchini—are categorized as vegetables. That's due in part to their lower carb and sugar contents: A medium tomato provides just 22 calories, and about 5 grams of total carb, with 3 as sugar and 1.5 as fiber. But this low-calorie, low-carb package is chock-full of nutrients, and has been linked to a variety of health benefits. Here are seven, along with some simple ways to incorporate more tomatoes into your everyday meals and snacks.

Tomatoes are a great source of vitamins
A single tomato can provide about 40% of the daily recommended minimum of vitamin C. What's more, tomatoes supply vitamin A, which supports immunity, vision, and skin health; vitamin K, which is good for…

TOMATO FOR HEALTH

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Heart health
The fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and choline content in tomatoes all support heart health.

An increase in potassium intake, along with a decrease in sodium intake, is the most important dietary change the average person can make to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.

Tomatoes also contain folate. This helps to balance homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is an amino acid that results from protein breakdown. It is said to increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes. The management of homocysteine levels by folate reduces one of the risk factors for heart disease.

Not only is high potassium intake also associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but it is also known for protecting the muscles against deterioration, preserving bone mineral density, and reducing the production of kidney stones.

4) Diabetes
Studies have shown that people with type 1 diabetes who consume high-fiber diets have lower blood glucose levels, while people with type 2 diabetes …

Everything you need to know about tomatoes:

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A tomato is a nutrient-dense superfood that offers benefit to a range of bodily systems. Its nutritional content supports healthful skin, weight loss, and heart health.
Despite the popularity of tomatoes, it was only 200 years ago that they were thought to be poisonous in the United States (U.S.) This is likely to be because the plant belongs to the toxic nightshade family.

Tomatoes are now the fourth most popular fresh-market vegetable behind potatoes, lettuce, and onions. This article will examine their powerful health benefits, nutritional content, ways to include more tomatoes in the diet, and the risks of tomato consumption.

Fast facts on tomatoes
Including tomatoes in the diet can help protect against cancer, maintain healthy blood pressure, and reduce blood glucose in people with diabetes.
Tomatoes contain key carotenoids such as lutein and lycopene. These can protect the eye against light-induced damage.
Eat more tomatoes by adding them to wraps or sandwiches, sauces, or sals…

Health Benefits of Tomatoes:

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Chances are you’ve eaten a tomato today and you should be glad because the health benefits of tomatoes are quite impressive....

Few fruits are as versatile as the tomato—we use them to top salads and in sandwiches, they’re the base of ketchup, barbecue sauce, and other popular condiments, and they add both a sweet and savory flavor to soups, stews, gravies, and sauces. Southern Italian cuisine wouldn’t be the same without them, and classics like spaghetti & meatballs and pizza might have never been created if not for tomatoes. But what our doctors love most are the many health benefits of tomatoes.

One medium red tomato contains 22 calories, one gram of protein, 0.25 grams of fat, 4.78 grams of carbs, 1.5 grams of fiber, and 3.23 grams of sugar, according to the USDA. It also contains significant sources of vitamin A (20 percent of the recommended daily allowance) and vitamin C (28 percent of the RDA)....

Tomatoes originated in Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, and Peru and were cultivated by…